Press Review

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One of the prevailing themes in today's newspapers is that of increases, either in wages or in monthly pensions: PRAVO's lead story covers Education Minister Petra Buzkova's decision to raise Czech teacher's wages by 9 percent next year, 2 percent higher than other civil servants.

One of the prevailing themes in today's newspapers is that of increases, either in wages or in monthly pensions: PRAVO's lead story covers Education Minister Petra Buzkova's decision to raise Czech teacher's wages by 9 percent next year, 2 percent higher than other civil servants.

It's not a huge leap by any means, an average of about 1,300 crowns more each month, just over 40 U.S. dollars, and some union leaders are less than satisfied. Nevertheless, at a time when the government is weighed down by having to cover extensive flood damage, many do see the increase as a positive gesture, PRAVO writes.

Meanwhile, LIDOVE NOVINY says that old-age pensioners will also see a 4 percent rise in their monthly pension cheques, equalling just over 200 crowns - less than ten dollars. The increase will raise the average pension in the Czech Republic to about 7,000 crowns per month. According to the paper, just under 2 million old-age pensioners live in the Czech Republic out of an overall population of 10 million.

12,000 police officers and 2, 400 soldiers: that's the number of officials who will be employed to keep Prague safe during the upcoming NATO Summit in November, writes HOSPODARSKE NOVINY. The overall goal: to prevent the realisation of possible terrorist attacks, as well as to prevent hostile spy networks from operating in the country during the important summit. Also on the agenda: the monitoring of anti-summit demonstrations, of which 40 have already been announced.

The paper writes that aside from providing soldiers the Czech army will also provide armoured transport carriers, helicopters, a pyrotechnics team, doctors, and bodyguards at the summit. Increased safety and prevention measures are expected not only in the Czech capital but also on main thruways into the city, as well as at the country's border crossings.

Finally, ever wondered what its like to head a news team at a national television station? MLADA FRONTA DNES offers a profile and interview with anchorman Pavel Zuna in its TV listings supplement. Mr Zuna is the head of the popular nightly news at the Czech Republic's successful commercial station TV Nova.

In the interview Mr Zuna talks about the stress involved in his work, about the personal impact of events like the extreme flooding in the Czech Republic in August, and what he considers the highest standard of reporting of all - being a journalist in a war zone, which, admittedly, was never his case. Mr Zuna praises the work of Petra Prochazkova and Jaroslav Stetina, well-known independent Czech journalists who have worked in areas like Chechnya and Afghanistan. And, as far as appearing at the news desk in the evenings to be watched by a third of the country - Mr Zuna describes it as an obvious "adrenaline rush".