• 05/01/2002

    Meanwhile supporters of the Communist Party have gathered on Prague's Letna plain, for the party's annual rally. The head of the Communist Party, Miroslav Grebenicek, stressed the party's opposition to membership of NATO and the European Union, and warned of class struggle in the Czech Republic. The rally was attended by around ten thousand mostly elderly people.

    Author: Rob Cameron
  • 04/29/2002

    The first reactor at the Temelin nuclear power station, which was connected to the national grid for the first time in two months on Sunday morning, was disconnected again later on Sunday. The plant's spokesman said the reason had been a minor defect on a steam pipe. Until Sunday Temelin had been shut down for repairs to the non-nuclear part of the station. The safety of the plant, which combines Soviet design and western operating technology, continues to cause controversy.

  • 04/28/2002

    The first reactor at the Temelin nuclear power station was connected to the national grid for the first time in two months on Sunday morning. Temelin had been shut down for repairs to the non-nuclear part of the station. It is now running at around 40 percent of capacity. There has been a great deal of controversy over the south Bohemia plant, which critics say is unsafe.

    Author: Ian Willoughby
  • 04/25/2002

    The first contingent of a Czech Army field hospital crew has arrived in Kabul, Afghanistan, complete with terrain vehicles, technical equipment, and supplies, to take part in a six month mission. The first contingent, which includes 30 members, will prepare the site for the field hospital, which will staff some 150 Czech doctors and medical personnel expected to depart for Afghanistan at the beginning of May. The mission is expected to cost some 600 million crowns, although there is still uncertainty over how the mission will be funded.

    Author: Jan Velinger
  • 04/24/2002

    Technicians at the Czech Republic's Temelin nuclear power station restarted the plant's first reactor on Tuesday, amid fresh protests from Austrian anti-nuclear opponents. A spokesman said the reactor, shut down since late February for repairs to the plant's turbine, would operate at low levels during a brief testing period. The second of Temelin's two reactors will be started up for the first time next week, and both units are scheduled to be fully operational by the end of the year. The Austrian-based Anti-Atom Community said on Wednesday the Czech Environment Ministry "completely ignored" safety standards when it approved 78 building modifications at the plant. The claim was the latest in a series of protests from Austria.

    Author: Rob Cameron
  • 04/24/2002

    The first 30 members of a Czech army field hospital were due to leave for Afghanistan on Wednesday evening, despite lingering doubts over how the mission will be financed. The 30 soldiers will prepare the ground for the establishment of a 150-man field hospital in Kabul. Right-wing deputies recently rejected the government's proposals for financing foreign missions, a move that the Czech Defence Ministry says puts the Czech Republic's international reputation in jeopardy.

    Author: Rob Cameron
  • 04/23/2002

    The Czech Defense Minister Jaroslav Tvrdik is pushing for action in Parliament where deputies are expected to vote on the means of financing a Czech field hospital in Afghanistan. The government is in favour of issuing bonds worth 600 million crowns to help cover the expenditures but opposition politicians have criticized the plan, saying the government must find the money elsewhere. The Defense Minister is pushing for action and has threatened to resign if Parliament fails to find a means of financing the planned mission. The governing Social Democrats are planning to request an extraordinary Parliament session devoted to the matter. Meanwhile, an advance team of 30 Czech soldiers is to leave for Kabul on Wednesday to prepare the ground for the field hospital.

  • 04/23/2002

    Meanwhile, at a meeting of the joint Czech-EU accession committee in Prague, some deputies of the European Parliament expressed the view that although controversy over the Benes decrees should not disrupt the accession process the Czech Republic should not be allowed to join the EU until it had revoked the decrees. The co-chairwoman of the committee Ursula Stenzel, said she hoped that the resolution which the Czech Parliament is planning to approve will not close the door to further negotiations.

  • 04/22/2002

    Romany leaders in the north Moravian city of Ostrava have confirmed that Slovak Romanies bought false Czech passports in the city. A Slovak daily reported on Monday that Slovak Romanies were using the false passports to get into the United Kingdom and Ireland. Unlike Czech citizens, Slovaks need a visa to enter the two countries. The chairman of the Democratic Centre of Romanies Josef Facuna said the Slovak Romanies had bought the fake Czech passports for between two and five hundred dollars.

    Author: Ian Willoughby
  • 04/21/2002

    The Czech government is planning another campaign against racism and xenophobia. The campaign should be focused on high-school students who sociologists say are susceptible to propaganda from various racist and xenophobic groups. The campaign which is to be launched in May, will besides other things include discussions with representatives of ethnic minorities and refugees. The government will also provide money to public libraries for publications on ethnic minorities and human rights.

    Author: Vladimír Tax

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